FAQ

  • When will “The International Convention for the control and management of ships ballast water and sediments, 2004” (Ballast Water Management Convention) enter into force?

    The convention will enter into force 12 months after the date on which no less than 30 states representing no less than 35% of the gross tonnage of the world’s merchant fleet ratify the convention. With the ratification of Finland on 8 September 2016, 52 states with a combined gross tonnage of 35.1441% had ratified. This means the convention has entered into force on 8 September 2017.

  • How many states have ratified the convention so far?

    As of 27 July, 74 states representing more than 75% of the gross tonnage of the world’s merchant fleet have ratified the convention. The convention entered into force on 8 September 2017.

  • Who are the states that have ratified the convention?

    The states having ratified the convention can be found on the IMO website, go to the right page by clicking here.

  • Which vessels will need to comply to the Ballast Water Management Convention?

    The convention applies to a vessel of any type whatsoever above 400 GRT operating in the aquatic environment and includes submersibles, floating craft, floating platforms, FSU’s and FPSO’s.

  • I have read about a Universal Ballast Water Port Connector (UBPC) on your website, what does this mean?

    A Universal Ballast Water Port Connector (UBPC) is our in-house designed connector that can be used worldwide transferring ballast water to a mobile shore facility. The UBPC is the ‘connection’ between the vessel’s ballast system and a shore based ballast water treatment system.

  • What are the advantages of having a Universal Ballast Port Connector fitted on my vessel(s)?

    By installing a Universal Ballast Port Connector (UBPC) you can discharge ballast water to a shore installation which can be easily operated. It offers you an alternative for installing a complete ballast water treatment system on board your vessel.

  • Why would I install a Universal Ballast Water Port Connector (UBPC) on board my vessel?

    We are well aware of the investment cost of a ballast water treatment system on board, the lifetime cycle of a vessel and the current economic situation in the shipping industry. Vessels having a specific trade or vessels of a certain age can benefit from our solution.

  • Do you also provide the engineering / installation for the Universal Ballast Water Port Connector (UBPC)?

    Yes, we can provide you the service level you demand. Ranging from just the delivery of our Universal Ballast Port Connector (UBPC) up to a full service with the actual engineering / installation of the UBPC on your vessel(s) in dock or on-site. Please ask us for information about what situation fits you best.

  • Is the Universal Ballast Water Port Connector (UBPC) available in various capacities / flows?

    Yes, the Universal Ballast Port Connector (UBPC) can be engineered according to your vessel’s on board ballast system and ballast pumps capacity.

  • Seeing the advantages of the Universal Ballast Water Port Connector (UBPC), do you also offer the actual treatment of my ballast water?

    Yes, the Universal Ballast Water Port Connector (UBPC) is connectable to a mobile containerized unit equipped with an approved ballast water treatment system which can reach your vessel worldwide.

  • Can you also provide specific advice concerning an on board ballast water treatment system for my vessel?

    Yes, we have extensive knowledge regarding ballast water treatment systems and ships in order to provide you a sound advice.

  • Where can I find an overview of all ballast water treatment systems currently on the market?

    In our Ballast Water Treatment finder app you can find all systems currently on the market in their various configurations. You can filter out a suitable system for your vessel(s) by using one or more of the selection criteria available in the app. Go to the app here.

  • In which aspect differs the USCG Ballast Water Discharge Rule from the Ballast Water Management convention?

    The USCG Ballast Water Discharge Rule entered into force 21st June 2012. This means that, even without the ratification of the IMO Ballast Water Management Convention, vessel’s will need to adhere to the USCG Ballast Water Discharge Rule when calling a US port.

  • Is my Ballast Water Treatment plant automatically certified to operate in US Waters when the vessel’s classification society has approved the plant?

    No, the USCG has a different certification process in order to assess if the Ballast Water Treatment Systems adheres to their regulations.

  • Does this mean that I cannot call a US port when having a non-USCG approved Ballast Water Treatment System on board?

    No, you are allowed to call a US port. You are however restricted in the operation of your vessel. The ballast water cannot be pumped overboard. If needed, your ballast water must be given ashore or fresh water (drinking water) must be used for ballast purposes.

  • What is the certification process of a Ballast Water Treatment System by the USCG?

    The implementation of the USCG testing regime will take up to three years, a temporary approval and acceptance system has been set up and AMS (Alternate Management System) approval certificates are handed out with a validity of three years.

  • What is an AMS approval certificate?

    An AMS approval certificate is issued by the USCG and is a temporary approval certificate of a ballast water treatment system with a validity of three years. In these 3 years further tests will be conducted and, when everything is in order, a full term certificate will be issued.

  • What does the Ballast Water Management Convention actually require my vessel to do with its ballast water?

    The Ballast Water Management Convention defines two standards for discharged ballast water that the vessel must meet; 1. the ballast water exchange standard (D1-standard) and 2. the ballast water treatment standard (D-2 standard). The D-1 standard will eventually be phased out and replaced by the D-2 standard depending on the vessel’s date of construction and ballast water capacity.

  • What do I need to do in order to meet the D-1 standard with my vessel?

    there are three approved ballast water exchange methods (D-1 Standard)

    1. Sequential method. A process by which a ballast tank or hold intended for the carriage of ballast water is first emptied for at least 95% of its volume and then refilled with replacement ballast water.

     

    2. Flow through method. A process by which replacement ballast water is pumped into a ballast tank or hold allowing water to overflow through openings on deck (e.g. vent heads). In order to adhere to the standard the tank or hold volume should be pumped through at least three times.

     

    3. Dilution method. A process by which replacement ballast water is filled through the top of the ballast tank or hold with simultaneous discharge from the bottom side at the same flow rate and maintaining a constant level in the tank or hold. In order to adhere to the standard the tank or hold volume should be pumped through at least three times.

  • What do I need to do in order to meet the D-2 standard with my vessel?

    The D-2 Standard is a ballast water performance standard and refers to regulation D-2 of the Ballast Water management convention. The D-2 standard requires that vessels discharge:

    • Less than 10 viable organisms per m³ greater or equal to 50 µm in minimum dimension;

    • Less than 10 viable organisms per ml less than 50 µm in minimum dimension and greater than or equal to 10 µm in minimum dimension;

    • Indicator microbes not exceeding the following concentrations:

    1. Toxicogenic Vibrio Cholerae (O1 & O139) with less than 1 colony forming unit (CFU) per 100 ml or less than 1 CFU per 1 gram (wet weight) zooplankton samples.

    2. Escherickia Coli less than 250 CFU per 100 ml.

    3. Intestinal Enterococci less than 100 CFU per 100 ml.

  • What are active substances?

    An active substance is a substance or organism, including a virus or a fungus that has a general or specific action on or against harmful aquatic organisms and pathogens.

  • What type of ballast water treatment system creates active substances?

    Treatment systems which employ technologies such as electrolysis, chemical injections and ozonation create active substances.

  • What is “Holding Time”?

    Most of the ballast water treatment systems that are using an active substance will contain Total Residual Oxidants (TRO) that is added during the intake of ballast water. The Total Residual Oxidants react on the unwanted organisms to eliminate them. Total Residual Oxidants are toxic and unwanted in seawater when above certain concentrations. Due to this, ballast water passing through a system using active substances cannot be discharged immediately. The GESAMP – BWWG (Joint Group of Experts on the Scientific Aspects of Marine environmental Protection – Ballast Water Working Group) has decided that the level of Total Residue Oxidants at discharge must be below 0,2 mg/l (or ppm).

    The rate of degradation of the Total Residue Oxidants can be shortened by using neutralizers before the ballast water discharge.

  • Is the Holding time important for me whilst choosing a ballast water treatment system for my vessel?

    A vessel with a treatment system fitted on board that has a long holding time will not be allowed to de-ballast until the holding time has elapsed. Vessels that are on short voyages or have to adjust their trim due to, for instance, fuel oil consumption may have a problem with that.

    A holding time which is governed by the Total Residue Oxidents degradation can be overcome by neutralization.

    A holding time which is governed by biological efficiency cannot be shortened.

  • My vessel sometimes navigates in Fresh water. Is every ballast water treatment system capable of treating this ballast water?

    No, most ballast water treatment systems that utilize electrolysis cannot be used with fresh water. An additive will need to be injected in order to create the correct working process.

  • What capacity of ballast water treatment system do I need to install on my vessel?

    The ballast pump capacity of a vessel cannot exceed the Treatment Rated Capacity of the ballast water treatment system.

  • I want to install a smaller capacity ballast water treatment system on board utilizing only one ballast pump, is that possible?

    Yes, this is possible. However, due to the ballast system amendments it will not be that easy anymore to utilize your previous ballast piping configuration.

  • I am a barge owner, do my barges have to comply with the “Ballast Water Management Convention”?

    Yes, the ballasting and de-ballasting operations within the same coastal state zone does not require treatment according to the “Ballast Water Management Convention”.

    However, the residual water in tanks (approx. 2-3% of the tank capacity) that have been ballasted and / or de-ballasted may contain sediments and organisms from a foreign habitat. This water must be treated according to the D-2 standard before a new ballasting and / or de-ballasting operation can commence.

UniBallast B.V.

Galileistraat 15, 3029 AL Rotterdam, The Netherlands

Chamber of Commerce Rotterdam 59657162

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